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Wired has declared the "Web is Dead"

Really? Really?
Cause, funny, I thought thats what I was using to, ya know, post this and read my LJ Flist....
The main reason they (Chris Anderson and Michael Wolff) are stating this is that WE are all moving away from a browser based experience to an "app" based experience. Really? Maybe for them.... Check out this example that I can only assume they think is "normal":

"You wake up and check your email on your bedside iPad — that’s one app. During breakfast you browse Facebook, Twitter, and The New York Times — three more apps. On the way to the office, you listen to a podcast on your smartphone. Another app. At work, you scroll through RSS feeds in a reader and have Skype and IM conversations. More apps. At the end of the day, you come home, make dinner while listening to Pandora, play some games on Xbox Live, and watch a movie on Netflix’s streaming service.

You’ve spent the day on the Internet — but not on the Web. And you are not alone."

Uh-huh. I may listen to music on Pandora via an app on my iPhone or an app on my computer, but I know most people still use the ACTUAL webpage. Twitter, well, yes, the best way to access Twitter has always been an app or client. New York Times though? I go to the actual webpage there. CNN too. Also, I HATE RSS feeds. I have a few, but usually I just check the number of new articles and then immediately click through to the actual webpage...crazy I know, but I prefer to read articles online with the formatting and so forth that the author/editor originally intended.
Also, I'm not sure what they think we all do for a living but, I know my job still requires quite a bit of actual page visiting - *in a browser!*

Sometimes, I think tech writers get so close to their geeky-ness that they literally cannot comprehend a lifestyle outside of what they do and they think of themselves as *normal*. (shudder)

/shakes head

As has been pointed out before, sometimes, it just all comes down to the innate privilege and experiences we have. I know many many people that do not have any spiffy iGadgets and only occasionally use anything other than a browser to do anything on the web (sorry, internet). Where are their voices and experiences in this article? Did the authors even *think* about them?

Comments

( 1 Tummy Rub — Pet Angela? )
cathalexp
Aug. 18th, 2010 01:41 pm (UTC)
I agree with you on this. The best case he is making is that the browser is not the only way we use the web anymore.
( 1 Tummy Rub — Pet Angela? )